Lyd

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Lyd
Steam 150 (Sunday) - Flickr - Peter G Trimming (10).jpg
At Harbour Station, 2013. Photo: Peter Trimming.
Type L&B Manning Wardle Replica
Home Railway F&WHR
Number 14
Status In Service
History
Designed by Manning, Wardle & Co, and Boston Lodge
Built by Boston Lodge
Built 2010
5th August 2010 First moves under own power
11th September 2010 First public passenger train
Technical
Wheel Arrangement 2-6-2T
Length 28 ft
Fuel Coal
Locomotives

Lyd is a 2-6-2T locomotive running on the Ffestiniog and Welsh Highland Railways. It is a replica of a locomotive that used to run on the Lynton and Barnstaple Railway.

History[edit]

In steam at the FR Quirks & Curiosities Event 2nd May 2010 at Boston Lodge

Construction[edit]

Lyd is a close replica of Lew, one of the 2-6-2Ts of the legendary Lynton & Barnstaple Railway in Devon, closed in 1935. As there is a possibility (increasingly remote) that Lew may still exist in South America, where the engine was shipped after the L&B closed, a new name has been chosen. The first manufacturing tasks were carried out in Cornwall, but the main building of the engine later moved to the FR's Boston Lodge Works. The project is being funded partly by the individuals behind it, and partly by a variety of contribution schemes.

The loco was to carry the chimney of original Lynton and Barnstaple loco Yeo (built 1897, scrapped 1935), which spent 62 years on a steam roller, which now has a replacement chimney! This is seen in the pictures below. However the chimney has been found to be too corroded for further use, and a new one has been made.

In early 1999 the main chassis components of Lyd were moved to the premises of ESCA Engineering in Wigan, with a view to speeding up the fitting and assembly process. The largely complete rolling chassis was returned to Boston Lodge in time to be exhibited at the May 1999 Gala, where it was shown with the tanks, smokebox barrel and chimney fitted, making the size and proportions of the full-size loco clear for the first time. Since then, a great deal of work has been done on the remaining chassis components. With further work done but the tanks and smokebox removed, the rolling chassis of Lyd was on view at Minffordd during the FR's October 2000 Vintage Weekend.

The order for Lyd's boiler was placed in mid-December 2000, with the Bradford firm of Israel Newton, who have also built the new boiler for Garratt K1. The project had amassed the necessary funds to cover the estimated cost of £36,000 in one go.

By early July 2002 the outer firebox shell was almost complete, the boiler barrel had been attached to the throatplate, and the inner firebox was being welded up. It is intended to test fit the boiler to the frames as soon as it arrives at Boston Lodge, as the frames are ready to receive it. By the same time, the complex pony trucks had been completed at Boston Lodge, apart from the axleboxes, which awaited castings.

Lyd was displayed at Dinas during the September 14-15th 2002 Superpower Weekend. It had been hoped that the boiler might have been ready to be fitted for this display, but in the event it had not yet been delivered. The boiler was successfully hydraulically tested at Newton's on Friday,1st November 2002. It was dispatched by road to the FR the same day, arriving at Minffordd Yard early on Saturday November 2nd. The boiler was lifted directly into the frames (with the tanks previously removed) and secured with timber packing ready for immediate transport to Boston Lodge, hauled by visiting Hunslet Velinheli (owned by James Evans), before the first service train of the day.

During Spring 2003 the pony trucks were finished off. The panplate and burner for the oil firing system were fitted, and the crinolines were made (the supporting framework for the boiler cladding). Non-ferrous casting for various fittings and valves were to hand or on order. The incomplete loco was towed up the FR with a dummy wooden cab to test clearances. From this the decision was made to make a cab that would fit on the FR but have added pieces that could be fitted to give the original outline as seen historically. Lyd was stored at Glan-y-Pwll depot over Summer 2003, awaiting a spare slot in the Boston Lodge schedule for work to progress further.

The part-completed loco was displayed at "Railfest" at the National Railway Museum in York from May 29th to June 6th 2004 - a new loco helping to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the steam locomotive.

Harbour Station - on test,2010

Into traffic[edit]

It was steamed for the first time at the Quirks & Curiosities event in May 2010 and first moved under its own power on August 5th 2010, 147 years (and a day!) after Princess.

It was tested in the yard at Boston Lodge and later in the day, at Harbour Station. Further testing took place during August[video 1], and it made its first public runs at the WHR Superpower weekend in September 2010.

Shortly afterwards, Lyd also visited the Launceston Steam Railway and the reborn Lynton & Barnstaple Railway (accompanied by the former L&B Coach 15 (now FR Carriage 14) and FR Carriage 102 during September 2010. Lyd (along with Taliesin) became the first loco to haul a passenger train on the WHR originating at Porthmadog on 31st October 2010 with a special train for WHR construction personnel and contractors from Porthmadog to Rhyd Ddu and return.

At Rhyd Ddu 28th April 2011

During December 2010 Lyd was lined out in BR livery, given a BR early crest and numbered 30190, as a nod towards what might have become of the original L&B engines had they survived to nationalisation.

In September 2011 Lyd was repainted in full Maunsell-period Southern Railway green, with the number E190. In December it was converted to coal firing.

Lyd has enjoyed a good number of days in service on the FR and WHR along with regular visits to the L&B at Woody Bay. It has proved itself to be more than capable of pulling a eight car train. Despite being very well built by Boston lodge its mechanically interesting Joy valve gear has led to long down times for maintenance and lubrication issues as it is now fitted with mechanical and hydro static lubricators. The issue with the valve gear when it comes to maintaining it, it works perfectly well in service but unlike conventional valve gear which is made up of round bushes which get worn and can easily be replaced if they become worn by turning a new set on a lathe. With Joy valve gear is made up of mostly sliding faces like the guide bars which require much more machining work to keep them in the correct condition.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]