Ashbury 4-Wheel Carriages

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Ashbury 4-Wheel Carriages
Type First or Third Class compartment stock
Seating 2 x 6 x 3rd or 1st
Status Originals scrapped, Historical data
History
Built by Ashbury Co.
Built 1868
Technical
Length 10ft 3ins
Width 5ft 4ins
Frames Oak
Carriages
Four Ashbury carriages in 1871, with First Class No. 10 at the front of the train and 3 Third Class carriages behind it.


A second generation of six 4-wheeled carriages, Nos 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 14, was built for the line in 1868. It is probable that the bodies were provided by the 'Ashbury Railway Carriage and Iron Co.' and that Boston Lodge provided the underframe. These were more conventional than the 'Birminghams' having a higher floor and two compartments with six seats each.

From the 1880s, one of these vehicles appears to have been included in the quarrymen's trains, and it has been suggested that this was to meet the requirement to provide "Parliamentary trains".

Number 10 was a first class carriage and the remainder third class. Number 10 had four drop-light windows on each side (plus the two in the doors), but the third class carriages did not have the central pair of windows. A photograph from the mid 1890s suggests that at least one carriage was modified as it shows one with four side windows, bearing the number 14.

They were more cramped than the 'Birminghams' and gradually disappeared from use in the early years of the 20th century. According to Boyd Number 8 was withdrawn before 1922 and Number 7 in 1928. There were none in service by 1939. Two were allegedly taken to Nantmor on the WHR to serve as a Goods Shed.[1]

A door and footboard supports survived. These have been used to create a replica which appeared on the line in 2007

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